Month: January 2018

book review: Dark Game by Rachel Lynch

the blurb: Kelly’s gut turned over as she realised the danger she was in. She heard no sirens. She knew that she was simply collateral. To these men who made a lot of money from the suffering of others, they’d have no problem snuffing her out. After a scandal forces DI Kelly Porter out of the Met, she returns to her home turf in the Lake District. Crimes in the Cumbrian constabulary tend to be of the minor sort, but Kelly begins work on a cold case that shocked the local community – the abduction and brutal murder of ten-year-old Lottie Davies. Meanwhile, Kelly is also investigating two seemingly straightforward crimes: a case involving an illegal immigrant, and a robbery following the death of local businessman Colin Day. But evidence comes to light that reveals a web of criminal activity beyond anything Kelly imagined. Behind the veneer of sleepy, touristy towns lies a dark and dangerous underworld. As Kelly threatens to expose those with much to lose, she risks paying the ultimate price to get …

Introducing the first of my brand new blog features: an “indies corner”

My blog’s brand new feature, The “Indies” Corner, has been long coming, I know, but it’s finally here. And I know, I can almost hear your bewilderment out aloud as you wonder: And what exactly is this “indies” thing all about…? What’s an “indie” when’s at home…? And an “indies” corner? Well, my “Indies” Corner is where I’ll be talking about, and recommending, titles written and published by self-publishing authors, i.e., authors that choose to develop and commercialise their books outside the traditional publishing sector. Thus “indie” titles and “indie” authors”. Simple? Of course. And much better than meerkat insurance, I can promise you that much. There have been, I think, enough arguments pro and against both such publishing practice and the authors themselves, traditional publishers being seen as “the gatekeepers” of the industry and therefore its guarantors of quality standards, and indie authors as writers who somehow do not meet the required standard, and therefore fail to secure that most coveted of all things, a publishing contract. Before I started working with ‘indie’ authors, I had often wondered myself if that …

Review: If I die before I wake ~ by Emily Koch

This title was rather kindly sent to me by the publishers, Random House UK / Vintage. This review has also been published to NetGalley, GoodReads, LinkedIn, and my social media accounts. the blurb: HOW DO YOU SOLVE YOUR OWN MURDER? Everyone believes Alex is in a coma, unlikely to ever wake up. As his family debate withdrawing life support, and his friends talk about how his girlfriend Bea needs to move on, he can only listen. But Alex soon begins to suspect that the accident that put him here wasn’t really an accident. Even worse, the perpetrator is still out there and Alex is not the only one in danger. As he goes over a series of clues from his past, Alex must use his remaining senses to solve the mystery of who tried to kill him, and try to protect those he loves, before they decide to let him go. A stunning edge-of-your-seat debut novel with an unforgettable narrator. the review: If I die before I wake is Emily Koch’s debut novel, but you …

Review: Fire Sermon ~ by Jamie Quatro

This title was rather kindly sent to me by its publishers, Pan Macmillan/Picador. This review has also been published to NetGalley, GoodReads, LinkedIn, and my social media accounts. the blurb: Maggie is entirely devoted to her husband Thomas, their two beautiful children, and to God—until what begins as a platonic intellectual and spiritual exchange between writer Maggie and poet James transforms into an erotically-charged bond that challenges Maggie’s sense of loyalty and morality, drawing her deeper into the darkness of desire. A daring debut novel of obsession, lust, and salvation by the highly lauded author of the story collection, I Want To Show You More, Fire Sermonis a tour de force that charts with bold intimacy and immersive sensuality the life of a married woman in the grip of a magnetic affair. ♦ “It would be difficult to overstate the wonder I felt while reading this novel. It’s among the most beautiful books I’ve ever read about longing — for beauty, for sex, for God, for a coherent life.” — Garth Greenwell, author of What Belongs to You ♦ the …

~ so, cue in a brand new year; but do we really have to…?

And even more to the point: if this year is all as brand new as it’s supposed to be, why is it that it’s feeling already so old and déjà vu? Maybe it is our fault. All those things we keep relegating to the background, hoping perhaps that by systematically ignoring them we will consign them to some hole in history out of which they will not be able to climb to come and pester our days. But it does not work like that, and they do seem to have this way of coming back to haunt us. Or, at the very least, to inevitably colour everything around us, to cast a shadow of their own onto what we wanted to preserve, pristine and untouched: our brand new year, our yearly welcomed chance at renovation, at new beginnings. Thus with this new year. It has been so bandied about — 2018. That year. You know, the year. 2018. The year when it will all change out of recognition. The year when life as we have known it so far …