All posts filed under: list(icle)s short & long

reading the memoir in 2017 (part 1)

This spring and summer seem to be a good time for readers of adult nonfiction, with a good few of those releases belonging to the sub-genres of memoir and biography and coming out right in time for us to enjoy the great outdoors and the lovely, warm weather that we can but hope will follow. Undaunted as I still am on my learning journey throughout the genre, I intend to read a fair number of memoirs this year. The question now is, of course, which ones and where to start. Isn’t it always? So how about I start with a beckoning towards old loves? Because, when all is said and done, aren’t loves of old the most enduring ones? § Women’s memoirs Jess Phillips, Everywoman: One Woman’s Truth About Speaking the Truth It should come as no surprise then, at least to those who know me well or have been following me on social networks for any amount of time, that the first memoir I hope to be reading this year is a book a) by a woman, b) a woman who …

books, books, books — and prizes

Wow! Hasn’t this been a busy day, where books are concerned! The first bit of worthy book news is that the shortlist for this year’s Man Booker Prize has just been announced. So excited everyone seems to have been (and not just us humble readers waiting for a verdict) that the Man Booker Prize even tweeted the results before the press conference. So, here are the titles: Paul Beatty, The Sellout Debora Levy, Hot Milk Graeme Macrae Burnet, His Bloody Project Ottessa Moshfegh, Eileen David Szalay, All That Man Is Madeleine Thien, Do Not Say We Have Nothing The surprise here, for me, is that The Many, a book that some tipped as a very serious contender, didn’t make it into the shortlist after all. Of the ones that did, I already had four added to my list (Levy’s, Burnet’s, Szalay’s and Thien’s), so I only have to look forward to Beatty’s The Sellout and Moshfegh’s Eileen. … On a definitely more modest scale than the Man Booker Prize, there’s a new armful of books being added to the reading list, this time …

So, here’s my summer reading list…

      Holidays are here (almost). And holidays for me mean that time of year when I try really hard to unwind and think of absolutely nothing and do absolutely nothing except gazing at the clear deep blue skies and, yes, read until my eyes (almost) pop out. This year I have it all planned out: a month of pure, uninterrupted reading bliss in early summer as we traipse around Europe… This will be followed by another month or so at home with their majesties, doing bits here and there (i.e., spurring man on to do some diy while I finish tweaking the blog and write, write, write). Then, in late summer and early autumn, there will be yet another month or so of pretty much the same bliss, but without the timetables and routines imposed by cohabitation with Their Cattinesses and my fellow cat herder. Just me, the patio, the old rickety wicker armchair, a couple of cushions, a foot stool, the rustling of the trees and the Portuguese fair weather, and the beautiful deep …

books acquired

  With holidays coming up soon, and as if I haven’t already got something of a reading backlog, stocking up on reading material never seemed so justified (though not according to my husband, to the kitties, or indeed to my poor, already-bursting-at-the-seams Kindle…). So, unable to resist all there is out there to be read, and in case that, come the day, I didn’t feel like reading any of the books I already have, I went on a bit of an e-shopping spree for some light reading. Here are my latest e-book acquisitions: 1 . Kat Gordon, The Artificial Anatomy of Parks [Kindle Edition, £0.99] I was intrigued by the title of the book, which made me stop for a little while and consider a park in its fullness and entirety and how adequately, suddenly, the word anatomy seems to fit in in its description. The title stuck in my mind and, when looking for summer bargains, the book popped up again; I reread the synopsis and it seemed interesting; I checked the rating, and it is …