All posts tagged: the “indie” authors’ corner

my first guest on The “Indies” Corner: John Hindmarsh answers The 39 Questions

    Today is a double special day ~ it’s not just the day The “Indies” Corner first goes live, but the day I introduce you to my very first guest, writer John Hindmarsh, an Australian-born writer of thrillers and sci-fi, who used to be an ICT consultant and who just may have been around the globe more than once in his lifetime… Between long-term and short-term assignments, John tells me he has worked in about a dozen different countries worldwide, and visited another dozen or so as a tourist. The list of countries he’s been to is truly enviable, and includes such places as Amsterdam, Istanbul, Singapore, Bangkok, Moscow, Athens, Copenhagen… In the last five years of his career, John sub-contracted with IBM, working with banking clients at a senior level. He has now settled in the California mountains, in the company of his Japanese American wife. And John added about himself: “[I s]topped all that [sub-contracting] at the end of 2012. I turned 79 at the beginning of this month [Feb]. I have …

Introducing the first of my brand new blog features: an “indies corner”

My blog’s brand new feature, The “Indies” Corner, has been long coming, I know, but it’s finally here. And I know, I can almost hear your bewilderment out aloud as you wonder: And what exactly is this “indies” thing all about…? What’s an “indie” when’s at home…? And an “indies” corner? Well, my “Indies” Corner is where I’ll be talking about, and recommending, titles written and published by self-publishing authors, i.e., authors that choose to develop and commercialise their books outside the traditional publishing sector. Thus “indie” titles and “indie” authors”. Simple? Of course. And much better than meerkat insurance, I can promise you that much. There have been, I think, enough arguments pro and against both such publishing practice and the authors themselves, traditional publishers being seen as “the gatekeepers” of the industry and therefore its guarantors of quality standards, and indie authors as writers who somehow do not meet the required standard, and therefore fail to secure that most coveted of all things, a publishing contract. Before I started working with ‘indie’ authors, I had often wondered myself if that …

Clever Girl ~ a short story by Craig Anderson

  “Welcome to Mind Chip madam, how may I assist you today?” Sarah glanced around nervously, “Is this the place where you sell the brain chips?” The salesman nodded enthusiastically, “If you mean the IQ boosting, wireless cognitive enhancement devices then yes, you’ve come to the right place. Are you looking for something in particular?” A small girl peeked out from behind Sarah’s legs, her yellow pigtails tied off with bright pink bows. Sarah gestured to her, “I’m looking for something for my daughter. I want to give her the best start in life.” The salesman bent down and held out his hand, “Nice to meet you young lady, I’m Ben. What’s your name?” When she didn’t answer the salesman tried again, “Ravi de vous rencontrer jeune femme, je suis Ben.” The young girl stared at him dumbfounded. Sarah leaned over her daughter, “It’s ok sweetie, you can say hello.” The little girl clung tightly to her mother’s leg as she whispered, “I’m Charlotte.” “And how old are you Charlotte?” After a moment to calculate …

Review: The Three Deaths of Magdalene Lynton ~ Katherine Hayton

My copy of this book was kindly sent to me by the author, Katherine Hayton, in return for an honest review. The Three Deaths of Magdalene Lynton is the second book I read by indie author Katherine Hayton. The first one was Skeletal, which is described as a ‘supernatural thriller’, and relates the story of the murder of a teenage girl who is bullied at school and slowly descends into madness. I think I gave Katherine 3 stars for Skeletal, inasmuch as I’d love to have seen the protagonist’s mental illness differently explored. The title however stayed in my mind, as did Katherine’s name as an author of consistent promise. So much so that, when Katherine asked for readers for her new novel, I did not hesitate. I knew it would be a crime thriller, and I knew Katherine would not disappoint my expectations. And she didn’t. Hayton’s new book, The Three Deaths of Magdalene Lynton, tells exactly the story of its title. There is a teenage girl, Magdalene Lynton, who lives in a religious …